Liberal Studies - Indigenous Studies

LIBI
City: Sarnia
Two-Year Ontario College Diploma
SEP Open

Overview

An Indigenous-focused stream of the Liberal Studies diploma, featuring a built in 2+2 pathway for eligible graduates to obtain both their Ontario College diploma, plus an Honour Bachelor of Arts degree.

In response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Lambton College is offering a dedicated stream of the Liberal Studies program that will address the university attainment gap for Indigenous students as well as, provide an opportunity for non-indigenous students to be better equipped to understand varied perspectives as daily life and mainstream employment intersect with Indigenous people.

Students will learn about the historical and contemporary relationships between Canada and Indigenous people as well as Indigenous ways of knowing. This diploma is filled with Indigenous-focused electives, alongside liberal studies courses, providing a well-rounded education that develops students' critical thinking.

A program built with pathways in mind, eligible graduates can continue their educational journey toward earning an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Studies degree with McMaster University or a Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Studies from Wilfrid Laurier University.

Credential Awarded

Graduates of this program are awarded a Liberal Studies Ontario College Diploma.

Admission Requirements

O.S.S.D. or equivalent with:

  • Grade 12 English C or U

Mature Student Assessment for this program is available in the subject of English for the purpose of demonstrating proficiency in this required admission subject. For all other admission requirements, applicants must complete the required course(s) as listed above. For more information, please contact counselling@lambtoncollege.ca. Review the Mature Student Admission process.

Academic admission requirements can be obtained through Academic Upgrading and the Pre-Programs at Lambton College.

College Diploma to University Degree in Four Years

Lambton College is working in partnership with Wilfrid Laurier University and McMaster University providing an opportunity for students to enrol in the Liberal Studies - Indigenous Studies pathway. This 2 + 2 pathway to Indigenous-focused degree programs allows students to complete a diploma and a university honours degree in four years.

Students who graduate with an overall 75% are eligible to apply to one of the following:

Wilfrid Laurier University
Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Studies
McMaster University
Honours Bachelor of Arts - Indigenous Studies

Costs

  • Year 1 $4,100.94
  • Year 2 $4,018.94

Please Note: These fees apply to the 2024-2025 academic year and are subject to change. Fees do not include books (unless specifically noted), supplies or living costs.

Technology Requirements

In order to keep pace with the requirements of each and every course in your program, Lambton College requires that each student have access to a laptop while studying at our college.

Courses

ANT-1003
Introduction to Physical Anthropology

As Canadians move to recognize, rebuild, and construct a more equitable and sustainable future, ANT 1003 reminds us of our global and also personal interconnection to the world at large through the lens of human bio-cultural evolution, genetic inheritance, social and cultural innovation. Biodiversity, global responsibility and engaged interdependence are core themes running throughout ANT 100's learning outcomes and applied learning assignments (ALA). Each of the five units includes opportunities to apply learning through small group dialogue, gamification, and personal reflection with the goal of building greater self-awareness as part of a wider interdependent community.

COM-1013
Critical Thinking & Writing

In this writing course, students respond to current issues and news articles via various styles of paragraphs and essays. Students practice thinking critically and organize and hone their writing to ensure clarity and correctness in their messages. Students explore different perspectives, and through synthesis, analysis, and response, strive for clarity of message and diplomatic expression of opinion based on fact. One of the pillars of Lambton College is a commitment to sustainability and equity, diversity, and inclusion, including Indigenization of the curriculum; where appropriate, readings in this course will reflect this commitment. Critical Thinking and Writing lays the foundation for a subsequent research-writing course.

PSY-1003
Psychology I

This course focuses on how we behave. It is an attempt to understand ourselves and others. The primary goal of this course is to see psychology as an objective way of studying human experience.

SCU-1403
Indigenous Family Structure

This course explores the general impacts of colonization and the Canadian Child Welfare System on Indigenous parenting of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) societies through an analysis of pre- and post-contact. Students are introduced to Indigenous Worldviews and explore historic and systemic racism from a trauma informed lens. As part of the overall learning, students participate in Indigenous learning methodologies.

SCU-2003
Indigenous Wholistic Practices

Examine a wholistic view of land based health and wellness as practiced by Indigenous Peoples past, present, and future. Analyse the impact of colonization and associated ethical impacts. Define wholistic health and wellness for community, individuals, and society.

MTH-1163
General Mathematics I

This general course in mathematics reviews and enhances topics in arithmetic, algebra, linear graphs, measurement, and statistics. A problem solving approach is used throughout the course, and there are many practical applications.

COM-2053
Communications for Community Services

This course enhances students' communication skills in preparation for work in community services. Through the theme of "advocacy and education," students read, examine, and respond to selected essays and articles, creating research reports and research presentations to share with their peers. The research process provides students with the opportunity to develop their writing skills through critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, application, and evaluation. These skills are necessary for success in current and future college courses, the workplace, and students' personal lives.

PSY-1053
Human Relations

This course provides a forum for enhancing students' abilities and understanding of the value to human social interaction through communication and connection. This course places a strong emphasis on applied learning in the context of communicating with others, recognizing that personal development evolves from social interaction. Course topics include the study of emotion-focused brain functionality, self-understanding and awareness, understanding the importance of perception skills in relationships, developing strong verbal and nonverbal communication skills, recognizing prosocial leadership skills, understanding and establishing healthy team dynamics, and addressing conflicts in relationships.

SCU-1803
Impacts - Truth & Reconciliation

Examine historical context and content contributing to development and implementation of residential schools in Canada. Holistically explore the impact of law, colonization and the resulting cultural genocide in Canada. Analyze the findings of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and resulting 94 Calls to Action.

SCU-2203
First Nations, Metis & Inuit Perspectives

Examine First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) societies' pre and post contact. Critically analyse impacts of colonization on First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. Explore cultural, political, social, and economic perspectives relevant to FNMI peoples. Critique generational impacts and examine the relevance of measures such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous people.

SOC-1003
Sociology I

Focusing on the Canadian perspective SOC 1003 explores the intersectional influences on behavior within the context of human group life. The sociological perspective, data collection, socialization, crime, and the dynamics of group structure and stratification are critically assessed against the backdrop of global interdependence and socio-cultural change. Small group discussion and gamification of materials all offer an enhanced course experience for individual growth and understanding of sociology.

POL-1003
Canadian Politics & Government I

Through the lens of intersectionality POL 1003 examines the structure and function of government within Canada. The Constitution, federalism, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the electoral system and political participation are all used to frame a critical review of Canada's role in global sustainability, socio-economic interdependence, and decolonization. Regionalism, cleavages, and disadvantage are core themes further explored by learners through small group dialogue, gamification, and a critical analysis of current event topics which have included Indigenous rights; gender identity; Residential Schools; and structural racism. If you're looking to make a difference... look to POL 1003

SCU-2303
Indigenous Connection to the Land

Critically evaluate the impact of law, colonization, and treaties for Indigenous and Canadian citizens. Examine a variety of treaties that have influenced society and their resulting conflict of interests as demonstrated within current law.

SCU-1903
Indigenous Peoples Media & Art

Examine a wide variety of media and artistic sources that have influenced Canadian and Indigenous societies. Analyze the power dynamics influencing Canadian society, past, present, and future, and critique the respective generational impact on Indigenous Peoples.

ELEC-0003
Elective - Select 3

ANT-2003
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Employing the anthropological perspective this course examines culture and culture "life ways" through the lens of engaged interdependence, global socio-economic sustainability, and inclusion. Cross-cultural comparison, the nature of world order, decolonization, and the construction of identify and gender through culture are core themes running throughout ANT 200's learning outcomes and applied learning assignments (ALA). Each of the five units includes opportunities to apply learning through small group dialogue, gamification, and personal reflection, with the goal of building greater self-awareness as part of a wider interdependent community.

POL-2003
Canadian Politics & Government II

Responsible global citizenship, active political engagement, and the construction of a sustainable and inclusive society for all Canadians are core themes in POL 2003. Using intersectionality as a lens learners will examine the branches of Canadian government and political socialization while developing the tools to critically assess the roles played by mass media, public opinion polls and advocacy groups in shaping Canadian politics. Opportunities to apply learning through small group discussion, gamification, and critical analysis of current events specific to the Canadian experience are found throughout this course and have included topics such as: international terrorism; globalization; U.S Relations; and Indigenous identity. If you're looking to change the system, POL 2003 can show you where to start.

PSY-2003
Psychology II

This course focuses on how we behave. It is an attempt to understand ourselves and others. The primary goal of this course is to investigate the application of psychological information to people's lives.

SCU-1503
Global Citizenship First Nations, Metis & Inuit Perspectives

Explore the broad impact of globalization on First Nation, Métis, and Inuit peoples in Canada. Examine the revitalization of Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing and being (ontology and epistemology) in Canada and abroad and explore its influence on the notion of 'Global citizenship' that provides a framework to facilitate restoration of balance, sustainability, and conservation for future generations. Implement an experiential learning opportunity (e.g., culminating project) within community demonstrating the value of Indigenous Knowledge (e.g., global citizenship engagement).

SCU-1703
First Nation Languages - Resilience & Reclamation

Explore First Nations languages traditional to Turtle Island (North America) reflecting on origins, teachings, and storytelling. Holistically examine the colonial impacts and the resilience, resurgence, and reclamation of First Nations languages.

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Have Questions?

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Contact

Program Information

1-844-LAMBTON

Business, English & Liberal Studies

519-479-2365

Room B2-106

After Graduation

Employment Opportunities

A woman laughing at desk in the indigenous student center.

Our graduates use the Liberal Studies program to transfer to university or college diploma programs. Some graduates opt to enter direct employment. Recent data shows that Liberal Studies graduates are in high demand in a number of sectors, for instance, in the technology field. Graduates can also be found in community agencies, administration, marketing, education and social services.

Coollege Diploma to University Degree in Four Years

Lambton College, in partnership with Wilfrid Laurier University and McMaster University, provides an opportunity for eligible graduates. This 2 + 2 pathway to Indigenous-focused degree programs allows students to complete a diploma and a university honours degree in four years. Students who graduate with an overall 75% are eligible to apply to one of the following:

Wilfrid Laurier University - Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Studies

McMaster University - Honours Bachelor of Arts - Indigenous Studies

A student making a phone call outside.
Partnership with Wilfrid Laurier University and McMaster University

More Information

Indigenous-Focused General Education Electives

SCU-1403
Indigenous Family Structure

This course explores the general impacts of colonization and the Canadian Child Welfare System on Indigenous parenting of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) societies through an analysis of pre- and post-contact. Students are introduced to Indigenous Worldviews and explore historic and systemic racism from a trauma informed lens. As part of the overall learning, students participate in Indigenous learning methodologies.

SCU-1503
Global Citizenship FNMMI

Explore the broad impact of globalization on First Nation, Métis, and Inuit peoples in Canada. Examine the revitalization of Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing and being (ontology and epistemology) in Canada and abroad and explore its influence on the notion of 'Global citizenship' that provides a framework to facilitate restoration of balance, sustainability, and conservation for future generations. Implement an experiential learning opportunity (e.g., culminating project) within community demonstrating the value of Indigenous Knowledge (e.g., global citizenship engagement).

SCU-1703
First Nations Languages

Explore First Nations languages traditional to Turtle Island (North America) reflecting on origins, teachings, and storytelling. Holistically examine the colonial impacts and the resilience, resurgence, and reclamation of First Nations languages.

SCU-1803
Impacts of Truth & Reconciliation

Examine historical context and content contributing to development and implementation of residential schools in Canada. Holistically explore the impact of law, colonization and the resulting cultural genocide in Canada. Analyze the findings of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and resulting 94 Calls to Action.

SCU-1903
Indigenous Peoples Media & Art

Examine a wide variety of media and artistic sources that have influenced Canadian and Indigenous societies. Analyze the power dynamics influencing Canadian society, past, present, and future, and critique the respective generational impact on Indigenous Peoples.

SCU-2003
Indigenous Holistic Practices

Examine a wholistic view of land based health and wellness as practiced by Indigenous Peoples past, present, and future. Analyse the impact of colonization and associated ethical impacts. Define wholistic health and wellness for community, individuals, and society.

SCU-2203
First Nations Perspectives

Examine First Nations, Metis, and Inuit (FNMI) societies' pre and post contact. Critically analyse impacts of colonization on First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. Explore cultural, political, social, and economic perspectives relevant to FNMI peoples. Critique generational impacts and examine the relevance of measures such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous people.

SCU-2303
Indigenous Connection to the Land

Critically evaluate the impact of law, colonization, and treaties for Indigenous and Canadian citizens. Examine a variety of treaties that have influenced society and their resulting conflict of interests as demonstrated within current law.

Technology Requirements

It is recommended that students purchase a laptop with a Windows operating system.

Internet Speed Requirements

For best performance for students learning remotely, an internet connection with a minimum of 40 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload speed is recommended in order to effectively use video conferencing and remote lecture delivery software as well as, other online resources remotely. Due to the large area over which students may be dispersed, we are unable to recommend a specific provider, so you will need to inquire around your area to find one that best suits your needs.

Minimum Laptop Requirements

In order to access the internet and virtually-delivered software and courseware, student laptops should include the following at a minimum. By meeting the following specifications, students will be equipped to access software and courseware on their laptop through the internet:

  • Intel i5 8th Gen Processor or equivalent
  • 16 GB of RAM (with a minimum of 8 GB)
  • 100 GB HDD or more
  • HD Graphics
  • Webcam with a microphone
  • Wireless 802.11n/ac 5ghz capable
  • Windows Operating System (Windows 11)

Software

To ensure students are getting the most our of their classroom experience, some software will be required.

Lambton College has made this software easily accessible online. Students can leverage our Microsoft Office 365 software packages and services. In addition, much of the software you require for your courses will be available on demand for use on any device - on or off campus.